Des Moines, IA

Brass Armadillo Antique Mall

515-282-0082
701 NE 50th Avenue
Des Moines, Iowa 50313
OPEN DAILY from 9am – 9pm.
Google plus Facebook Pinterest Youtube
dsm_int1
General ManagerMike McWilliams
701 NE 50th Avenue
Des Moines, Iowa 50313
515-282-0082
800-775-2140

With more than 450 antique and collectible dealers under one roof, we have something for everyone. You can furnish every room in the house, or simply add to your collection when you shop at the Des Moines, IA Brass Armadillo Antique Mall. Fine antique furniture, vintage quilts, primitive art, exquisite china, and even porcelain and depression or carnival glassware can all be found in our 36,000 square feet showroom. For a truly recreational shopping experience that feels like a treasure hunt, come to the Brass Armadillo. The Roy Rogers buff and the Star Wars enthusiast will find their respective collectibles as well as lots of reference books offering information on value, pricing and collecting, as well as replacement hardware and refinish supplies.

Whatever you’re into, we’ve got something for you at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall, so come see what everybody’s talkin’ about!

The Des Moines, IA Brass Armadillo Antique Mall is a unique shopping adventure with millions of antique and collectible items to shop. And we’re easy to find. It’s right on I-80/35 between the Second Avenue and East 14th Street exits. To view a quick tour of the inside of the mall, check out our Google Business View by clicking this link.

Contact Des Moines Brass Armadillo

View All

Newest Listings Feed

023.JPG

Pete - Hard Plastic Clown

Description: This is one of the great Halloween hard plastic pieces.  It's Pete the clown.  In great shape and color. Images:  
020.JPG

Frankoma Cowboy Boot Bookends

Description: This is a set of cowboy boots to be used as bookends.  John Frank founded Frankoma Pottery in 1933, when he was still an art professor at the University of Oklahoma. At first Frankoma produced vases and other types of art pottery, using a beige clay from the Arbuckle Mountains, which today is known among Frankoma collectors as Ada clay. In 1936, Frank quit his position at the university and in 1938 he moved with his wife, Grace Lee, to Sapulpa, Oklahoma, on Route 66 just outside of Tulsa. For another 16 years they would transport Ada clay 150 miles to their pottery in Sapulpa, but in 1954 Frankoma switched to a local material, a reddish clay used by an area brick company. Images: